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Resume Pro Tip #15 (fonts, headshots, and formats)
August 13, 2020 at 11:00 PM
by Ryan Buxbaum
Leaving home prepared to shoot a campaign but the model didn’t show up and i had to improvise and it was worth it in the end. shot as the golden moment appeared.

Fonts: Some candidates think unusual resume fonts are a way to show their unique personality — or how creative they are. Comic sans may make your resume stand out, but not for the right reason. Same goes for Papyrus. Imagine an HR director reviewing tens or hundreds of resumes at a time. Flipping from one resume to the next, they won’t appreciate cute fonts. They may trash your resume for being hard to read or look at — or for looking unprofessional. If your resume does not fit with the organization’s standard and the image they want to project, you may not get the chance to interview and show how you’re actually a terrific candidate.

Headshots: More and more often we see candidates putting a headshot at the top of their resume. It used to be that only candidates from other countries did this. Now, young job seekers often feel their picture will help them look friendly and approachable. But the reality is that some companies cannot even consider candidates who include pictures on resumes because it might imply they discriminate against (or in favor of) candidates based on race or some other aspect of how they look (like age or weight).

Formatting: Microsoft Office offers tons of interesting formats to choose from, but the best format is simple. Contact info at the top, next a summary, followed by skills, awards or achievements, a detailed work history, then education. No need to place each section in clockwise-arranged boxes or hexagons. Keep it clear and simple.